International Conference of Theoretical and Applied
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
(TANN'17)


AUGUST 23 - 25, 2017 | TORONTO, CANADA

Program

The Conference will be held at Ryerson University in the The George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre. Please click here for map of the location.



Wednesday
August 23


3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Registrations
Registrations will be taking place in the hall next to room ENG-LG-015.

Thursday
August 24


8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Registrations
Registrations will be taking place in the hall next to room ENG-LG-015.
Room: ENG-LG-013
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Official Opening
Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada

9:15 AM - 10:05 AM
Keynote Lecture

Nanoengineering New Multifunctional Contrast Agents for Medical Imaging of Cancer
Dr. Naomi Matsuura, University of Toronto, Canada

10:05 AM - 10:55 AM
Keynote Lecture

Toward Atom Scale Ultra Low Power Classical Circuitry and Quantum Circuitry
Dr. Robert Wolkow, University of Alberta, Canada

10:55 AM - 11:15 AM
Coffee Break
10:55 AM - 11:15 AM
Session

Poster Session

11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Session

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application I

12:05 PM - 1:05 PM
Lunch
1:05 PM - 3:05 PM
Workshop

Development of Hetero-nanostructures for Advanced Biomedical Applications

Keynote Lecture

9:15 AM - 10:05 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Nanoengineering New Multifunctional Contrast Agents for Medical Imaging of Cancer
Dr. Naomi Matsuura, University of Toronto, Canada


Abstract
Imaging is a fundamental tool in the practice of medicine. In parallel with the development of improved imaging systems and techniques, there is increasing interest in designing new contrast agents that can help guide and assess personalized treatment for cancer patients. A new opportunity in materials science is the development of new injectable materials that can be activated by medical imaging radiation under image guidance to treat cancer. This talk will focus on the development of new contrast agents that can facilitate more focused and targeted delivery of cancer therapies to tumours for higher therapeutic ratios, and can permit the treatment of hard-to-access organs like the brain in a minimally-invasive manner. Specific examples of different hierarchical and composite contrast agents that are assembled to address and balance biological and physical challenges of contrast agent development will be given, with a focus on the use of perfluorocarbon bubbles, droplets and nanoparticles as multifunctional contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and therapy applications.

Keynote Lecture

10:05 AM - 10:55 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Toward Atom Scale Ultra Low Power Classical Circuitry and Quantum Circuitry
Dr. Robert Wolkow, University of Alberta, Canada


Abstract
Imaging is a fundamental tool in the practice of medicine. In parallel with the development of improved imaging systems and techniques, there is increasing interest in designing new contrast agents that can help guide and assess personalized treatment for cancer patients. A new opportunity in materials science is the development of new injectable materials that can be activated by medical imaging radiation under image guidance to treat cancer. This talk will focus on the development of new contrast agents that can facilitate more focused and targeted delivery of cancer therapies to tumours for higher therapeutic ratios, and can permit the treatment of hard-to-access organs like the brain in a minimally-invasive manner. Specific examples of different hierarchical and composite contrast agents that are assembled to address and balance biological and physical challenges of contrast agent development will be given, with a focus on the use of perfluorocarbon bubbles, droplets and nanoparticles as multifunctional contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and therapy applications.

Session

10:55 AM - 11:15 AM I The Poster Session will be taking place in the hall next to room ENG-LG-015

Poster Session
Session Chair: Dr. Naomi Matsuura, University of Toronto, Canada


Authors
Peng Chen, Fulong Jiang, Feng Xu, ZiLi Xie, Xiangqian Xiu, Dunjun Chen, Bin Liu, Ping Han, Yi Shi, Rong Zhang, Youdou Zheng
Authors
Xiangqian Xiu, Yuewen Li, Lin Chen, Xuemei Hua, Zili Xie, Peng Chen, Rong Zhang, Youdou Zheng
Authors
Zili Xie, Tao Tao, Hong Zhao, Peng Chen, Jia Peng Chu, Ting Zhi, Jiangping Dai, Fulong Jiang, Bin Liu, Dunjun Chen, Rong Zhang, Youdou Zheng
Authors
Seungmin Hyun, Tae Gwang Yun, Jeong Hwan Kim, Jae Sung Yoon, Chang-Su Woo

Session

11:15 AM - 12:05 PM

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application I
Session Chair: Dr. Arzu Sardarli, First Nations University of Canada, Canada


Time
11:15 - 11:25
Authors
Ali Nemati, Waseem Haider, S. Ghanbarnezhad, Zia Ur Rahman, Syed Nabeel Ahmed
Abstract
This project involves development and characterization of nanocomposite of functionalized graphene oxide with multi core-shell Fe3O4-ZnO-TiO2 nanoparticles (abbreviated as G-MCSN) with enhanced multi-functional properties. The multi core-shell nanoparticles consist of superparamagnetic core with modified shells of photocatalytic materials. After synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (using co-precipitation and solvothermal processes), it was coated with multi shells of ZnO and TiO2 (via a facile sol–gel rout). Functionalized graphene oxide was synthesized and mixed with multi core-shell nanoparticles to prepare the nanocomposite. The phases and morphology of the core-shell nanoparticles and the nanocomposite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE/SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM/SAED). The magnetization hysteresis curves of the samples were conducted by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM).
The results showed that the average size of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were less than 20 nm. The précised control of the procedure resulted in the formation of core-shell structure after coating with ZnO and TiO2. The median size of core-shell nanoparticles was less than 50 nm. TEM studies revealed the formation of a few layers functionalized graphene oxide (FGO), as well as core-shell nanoparticles. Vibrating sample magnetometer measurement showed that magnetic property of the core-shell nanoparticles was lower than the bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles (from 40.96 emu.g-1 in bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles to 20.13 and 12.98 emu.g-1 in core-shell nanoparticles). But, when nanocomposite was made (FGO with core-shell nanoparticles), magnetic property was increased in comparison with the core-shell nanoparticles from 12.98 emu.g-1 to 28.18 emu.g-1.
Keywords
Functionalized graphene oxide, core-shell nanoparticles, Fe3O4-ZnO-TiO2, TEM, VSM.
Time
11:25 - 11:45
Authors
Songlin Yang, Jin Zhang
Abstract
In this paper, the up-conversion nanoparticles were synthesized through chemical method and conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA)/ Immunoglobulin G (IgG) through different method. The up-conversion nanoparticles, BSA conjugated up-conversion nanoparticles and IgG conjugated up-conversion nanoparticles were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. The conjugation/deposition result has been investigated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The result of this study demonstrates that MAPLE is a suitable process for depositing organic/biological nanoparticles and the up-conversion nanoparticles could be deposited through MAPLE technique.
Keywords
Up-conversion nanoparticles, Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation, Immunoglobulin G, Bovine serum albumin, Proteins, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.
Time
11:45 - 12:05
Authors
Jan Smotlacha, Richard Pincak
Abstract
The electronic spectra of the nanostructured materials show an interesting behaviour under the influence of the uniform magnetic field: the dependence of the energy levels on the magnetic field shows a fractal structure. This feature follows from the procedure of the calculation in which the matrix form of the Schrödinger equation is replaced by a system of the Harper equations, where the exponentials with the magnetic factors are supplied to all of the terms. We show the electronic spectra for the case of the narrow phosphorene and graphene zigzag nanoribbons with atomic vacancies and for the nanoribbons equipped with the so-called Stone-Wales defects.
Keywords
Graphene nanoribbons, phosphorene, electronic spectrum, magnetic field, density of states, edge states, Stone-Wales defects

Workshop

1:05 PM - 3:05 PM

Development of Hetero-nanostructures for Advanced Biomedical Applications
Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada


Abstract
Tailor-made nanosystem refers the integration of different components/materials at nanoscale which can show multi-functional and unique properties. Rational design and fabrication of such hetero-nanostructures are vital to break the boundaries of traditional technologies. One of Dr. Jin Zhang’s research interests lies in producing magnetic and optical hetero-nanostructures which show distinguish properties, and have been applied in various devices, e.g. data storage, sensors, and targeted drug delivery, etc. It is quite challenge to control the interface of magnetic and non-magnetic materials to precisely gain the desired properties. Here, Dr. Zhang will show different hetero-nanostructures with magnetic and optical properties (from zero-dimensional hetero-nanostructures to three dimensional hetero-nanostructures). In addition, incorporating proteins with nanomaterials can enhance protein’s stabilities, and may lead to new applications. This workshop will also focuse on the different interactions between proteins and designed hetero-nanostructures. The applications of the protein-conjugated hetero-nanostructures in non-invasive biosensor and targeted drug delivery will be discussed.

Friday
August 25


Room: ENG-LG-013
9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Keynote Lecture

Nanoscale Heat Transport and Magnetism in Magnetic Data Storage Applications
Dr. Simone Pisana, York University, Canada

9:50 AM - 10:40 AM
Keynote Lecture

Combination of Nanomaterials and Organic Semiconductors for Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Fabrication
Dr. Ricardo Izquierdo, Université du Québec, Canada

10:40 AM - 11:00 AM
Coffee Break
11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Session

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application II

12:00 PM - 12:10 PM
Group Photo
12:10 PM - 1:10 PM
Lunch
1:10 PM - 2:10 PM
Session

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application III

Keynote Lecture

9:00 AM - 9:50 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Nanoscale Heat Transport and Magnetism in Magnetic Data Storage Applications
Dr. Simone Pisana, York University, Canada


Abstract
The hard disk drive has been a key technology in computing for over 60 years, and in spite of the advent of solid state drives which now dominate consumer products, advances in nanoscience are making their way into the hard disk drive to continue to support the demands of cloud computing. In this talk I will outline heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), a technology coming into production soon that allows data storage densities to go beyond what was thought to be the unbreakable superparamagnetic limit of 1 Tera-bit per square inch. Specifically, I will focus on some of the nanoscale aspects of heat transport and magnetism that have posed challenges in the development of HAMR. Regarding heat transport, I will discuss heat dissipation issues in nanostructures such as the near-field plasmonic antenna used to record the data, and show that changes in phonon dispersion in layers only a couple nm in thickness can have a surprising impact on interfacial heat flow. In terms of magnetism, I will present the characterization of the distribution in Curie temperatures in the nanoscale ferromagnetic grains used to store the data. This optical pump-probe technique bypasses the difficulty of attempting to measure the vanishing magnetization at the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition, and opens up new questions in the physics of magnetization dynamics at high temperature.

Keynote Lecture

9:50 AM - 10:40 AM | Session Chair: Dr. Jin Zhang, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Combination of Nanomaterials and Organic Semiconductors for Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Fabrication
Dr. Ricardo Izquierdo, Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Canada


Abstract
The use of a combination of nanomaterials and organic semiconductors offers a great flexibility for the fabrication of various electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this talk, we will present various types of device, which were obtained by using such a combination. First device is an organic memory consists of two aluminium electrodes separated by a layer from an organic semiconductor that contains gold nanoparticles supported by parylene pillars. A second example is the use of carbon nanotubes or graphene for semi-transparent conducting electrodes for electroluminescent organic diodes (OLEDs). We will also discuss about the efficiency enhancement of a standard bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell by the incorporation of various nanomaterials such as a nanohybrid composite material made of lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or by the incorporation of gold nanorods. Finally, the combination of a semitransparent electrochemical sensor, made from silver nanowires, and a fluorescence sensor, made from organic optoelectronic components, in order to build a sensing platform for water toxicity evaluation, will be presented.

Session

11:00 AM - 11:50 PM

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application II
Session Chair: Dr. Simone Pisana, York University, Canada


Time
11:00 - 11:20
Authors
Rauf Sardarly, Arzu Sardarli, Famin Salmanov, Nurana Aliyeva, Samira Gahramanova, Mahammed Yusifov
Abstract
In this paper, we report the results of our studies on temperature and electric field dependences of conductivity in TlS, TlSe and TlInS2 crystals. At a certain temperature (typical for all three crystals) a switching effect has been observed for the conductivities of all crystals. The switching effect is explained by the phase transition to the superionic conductivity. It is suggested that in TlS and TlSe crystals the ion conductivity is caused by the diffusion of Tl+ ions over vacancies in the thallium sub-lattice between (Tl3+S2-2) and (Tl3+Se2-2) chains. In TlInS2 crystals, this effect is due the diffusion of Tl+ ions towards vacancies in the Tl sub-lattice. In all crystals S-type switching effect is revealed. It is suggested that the switching effect is related to the transition of crystals to the superionic state, which is accompanied by diffusion of Tl+ ions.
Keywords
Superionic conductivity, crystal, phase transition, nanoscale, low-dimensional, switching effect
Time
11:20 - 11:40
Authors
Denghuang Zhan, Longyi Chen, Wai Hei Tse, Longyan Chen, Jin Zhang
Abstract
The monitoring and management of blood glucose levels are key elements for people with diabetes to maintain their health. Here, we describe a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) sensor for non-invasively detecting glucose molecules. The sensor is assembled by conjugating quantum dots CdTe (PL≈ 565nm), which is used as the acceptor, with a recombinant protein containing the bacterial glucose binding protein (GBP), at the N-terminal and a bioluminescent protein Renilla luciferase (Rluc), used as the donor, which is at the C-terminal. The distance between the BRET pair is initially far. In the presence of glucose, GBP binds glucose in a highly specific manner and the conformational change of resultant GBP brings a closer distance between the Rluc and QDs, results an increasing of the emission intensity of the QDs. The bioluminescence intensity of both around 470nm and 565nm are observed. The ratio of the acceptor (QDs) and the donor (Rluc) are also observed to increase with the increasing of the glucose concentration. This study laid a technical foundation for further exploration of non-invasive measurement systems for tear glucose.
Keywords
Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), Luciferase, Glucose binding protein, Quantum dots, Tear glucose, Non-invasive biosensor
Time
11:40 - 11:50
Authors
Salma M. Z. Al Kindy, Mouza Al Ruqaishy, Faisal Al Marzouqi, Rengaraj Selvaraj

Session

1:10 PM - 2:10 PM

Nanomaterials, Nanodevices: Fabrication, Characterization and Application III
Session Chair: Dr. Salma AlKindy, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman


Time
1:10 - 1:30
Authors
Mahtab Asadian, Heidi Declercq, Rino Morent, Nathalie De Geyter
Abstract
In this study, chitosan (CS)/polyethylene oxide (PEO) nanofibrous mats (Ø: 166 ± 43 nm) were prepared by electrospinning and subsequently subjected to a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) treatment in the presence of three different gases (argon, ammonia/helium and nitrogen). Afterwards, water contact angle measurements, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the surface properties of the CS/PEO nanofibers (NFs) before and after plasma treatment. Cell behaviour of the fibers was also evaluated by live/dead fluorescence microscopy one day and seven days after seeding of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) on the CS/PEO NFs. In addition, the morphology of the cells on the NFs was also visualized making use of SEM.
The obtained results revealed that the water contact angle on the CS/PEO NFs could be significantly decreased from approximately 59° to 10°, 26° and 43° after plasma modifications in NH3/He, N2 and Ar respectively. XPS results revealed that N2 and NH3/He plasma treatments result in the incorporation of nitrogen-containing functional groups while argon plasma treatment mainly result in a partial degradation of the CS/PEO polymer chains. The DBD treatments are thus able to strongly increase the hydrophilicity of the CS/PEO nanofibrous mats. In addition, it was also observed that cellular interactions on the CS/PEO NFs were also significantly increased due to these plasma treatments. Hence, an effective plasma-induced surface modification of nanofibrous CS/PEO surfaces can significantly improve the biocompatibility of CS/PEO. The best outcome of cell proliferation was noted for the argon plasma modification, which was even higher than the positive control sample although the hydrophilicity was the lowest in this case. The observations thus suggest that not only the hydrophilicity characteristics but also the presence of distinct functional groups on plasma treated CS/PEO NFs itself might have a significant influence on the observed enhanced cellular interactions.
Keywords
Electrospinning, chitosan/PEO nanofibers, non-thermal plasma treatment, cell interactions
Time
1:30 - 1:50
Authors
R. Al-Gaashani, Md. Anower Hossain, Fahhad H. Alharbi, Abdelbaki Benamor, Abdelhak Belaidi, Belabbes Merzougui, N. Tabet
Time
1:50 - 2:10
Authors
Tao Tao, Ting Zhi, Bin Liu, Zili Xie, Peng Chen, Xiangqian Xiu, Hong Zhao, Rong Zhang